On February 25, Aaron Bushnell set himself on fire at the gate of the Israeli embassy in Washington, DC as an act of protest against the ongoing genocide of Palestinians in Gaza. Hostile critics have attempted to shrug off Aaron’s action as the consequence of mental illness. On the contrary, Aaron’s choice was a political action arising from his deeply held anarchist convictions. In the following collection, we share Aaron’s own summary of his politics, followed by testimony from three of Aaron’s close friends.

  • speck
    link
    fedilink
    72 months ago

    Thank you for sharing this. Not completely finished it yet, but what a counter point to some of mainstream coverage

      • speck
        link
        fedilink
        5
        edit-2
        2 months ago

        Thanks! Will watch it

        Edit to say I watched it. His friend was incredibly well spoken. And brave in his own right, frankly.

        • SteveOP
          link
          21 month ago

          Tthanks. When you reply to posts or comments, consider commenting on the content of the post as well as the form

  • @Schmoo
    link
    62 months ago

    The more I read and hear about this man, the more I see a reflection of myself. While our lives went in different directions, the descriptions of his upbringing and of how his beliefs changed over time mirror my own so closely that I feel like I’ve lost a brother I never had the pleasure of meeting. Even his friends’ accounts of his mannerisms remind me a lot of myself, and I feel the same guilt at how little I am able to do in the face of so much injustice.

    It makes me incredibly sad and angry at the system that drove Aaron Bushnell to such an extreme act. That his life and body burned in order to inspire this feeling in me is devastating, but highlights that burning one’s life and body as well as the life and body of others is the routine and cold logic the state uses to maintain its hegemony.

    • @dillekant
      link
      62 months ago

      He’s me on a good day, maybe my best day. One thing is for sure, I never met him but he’s our people.

  • schmorp
    link
    English
    52 months ago

    No, no and no. Of course he was free to do what he wanted, but come on, can we please finally stop glorifying suicide for whatever reason? We cannot afford to lose more kindhearted people.

    Sorry if my input offends anyone, but this makes me angry and sad. Anarchy is not supposed to be a cult of martyrs.

    • SteveOP
      link
      72 months ago

      I understand your sentiment and appreciate it but I disagree with it. I’m not offended but I’m curious if you read all this. In no way is anyone glorifying suicide or encouraging it and his friend from the military states clearly that that’s not what this was. I didn’t read this is as glorifying or martyring him but honoring the message and who this man was. I’m sad as well but would rather do that without directing anger at those remembering him.